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About

Playing Kate: Mother Trouble-Makers and performances of the family in austerity Britain.

Playing Kate is a PaR project aligned to Jodie Hawkes' PhD research titled Mother-trouble-makers: revolting maternal subjects and public performances of the family in austerity Britain.  In Playing Kate Jodie re-stages moments from her own maternal experience through the guise of the Duchess of Cambridge. Playing Kate is a practical frame encompassing multiple artistic outputs, including performances, videos, photographs and public appearances. These projects conflate two vastly differing maternal realities, exploring how Jodie’s own maternal subjectivity is defined by the public performances of the Duchess of Cambridge. Whilst Middleton and the new Royals attempt to appear just like us, here I am performing just like her as she tries to perform just like me.

The PhD PaR project has focused on repli-Kating key moments in the public maternal transformation of Kate Middleton to new mother. The practice as research examines the first three post birth appearances of the Duchess; when she leaves the hospital (2013), when she is spotted post-birth at the supermarket (2013) and the release of the first official family portrait, taken in the Middleton family back garden. (2013)

Photo credit: Zoe Manders
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Search Party

Search Party is the collaboration of artists Jodie Hawkes and Pete Phillips.

Formed in 2005 our work has encompassed theatre, live art, durational performance, participatory art, home video and performative writing. Our work playfully disrupts our position(s) in the world, as underdogs, as parents, as consumers, as lovers, as strangers, as ageing bodies, as armchair sports fans, as generation-renters, as amateur runners, and as timid climate activists. We have made performances for theatres, galleries, public squares, 24-hour parties, high streets, village fetes, parks, shopping centres, across rivers, between bridges and along seafronts.

Photo credit: Paul Blakemore